Drinks

A bunch of grenache (or garnacha) grapes hang on the vine.

Known as grenache in France and garnacha in Spain, this grape makes a great blending partner, but can stand on its own as a single variety.

wine, burgundy, bordeaux, wine history, pinot noir, chardonnay

Learn about wine that’s as old as the region itself.

Deb and Steve Long of 3rd Act Craft Brewery

As local beer-lovers know, Woodbury was still in the dark as the craft-brewing boom started to hit the rest of the metro in recent years.

Red wine, pinot noir

No other grape adopts the profile of its terroir more than pinot noir.

A variety of romantic wines.

Valpolicella, Ripasso and Amarone. Just saying the names sounds romantic.

I’m sure we’ve all read descriptions of wines and thought to ourselves, “What are they talking about?!” Some descriptive words for wines, like “linear,” “brawny,” “fleshy,” “meaty,” and “fat” leave me perplexed.

Sales for sparkling wines soar during the holidays. Most of us pop a cork to ring in the New Year. And with good reason—celebrations and sparkling wines pair perfectly. But it’s time to think beyond the holidays: Sparkling wine goes very well with many occasions and many foods.

The most common reaction I get when asking friends about Riesling is: “Riesling is too sweet!” Sure, Riesling wines can be sweet, but quite often they’re far from it. Dry Rieslings are some of the most popular food-friendly wines available.

Suggesting there’s anything hidden about Spanish wine is a bit odd. Spain is a large country with more acres of vines planted than anywhere in the world, and the list of great wines is a mile long. That said, Spain often plays third fiddle behind France and Italy.

In no way are the wines of southern Italy new. As a matter of fact, they are some of the world’s oldest, going back centuries to the Roman Empire. However, they are experiencing a resurgence here in the U.S. that offers consumers new and exciting choices.

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